Friday, May 24, 2013

Trellis - all about it(?) Part Two

Today's boo-boo - I'm on some sort of hot streak here - involved my finger meeting the hollow chisel mortiser in an untoward manner:


I'll spare you the graphic photos. It's really not too bad. In fact, I understand that black electrical tape bandages are all the rage among the fashion-conscious set.

Moving along with trellis 2.  Time for the rod mortises to receive their trenched abutments for the two shachi pins that will be employed:


Some chisel work ensues:


This one is done, and seven more to go:


Here's the next one:


The rest, well, much the same.

Peace, man:


 A tusk tenon mortising session was next on the list:


Squinted abutments done, save for final trimming if required during fitment:


I guess a few 'peaces' can now go together with their crosswise mates:




The mitered abutments have only been rough-trimmed at this point. I prefer to leave final fitting and fettling of the joinery for the morning when I am fresh.

Another piece can be added to the puzzle - you can see where I made the shachi sen abutments earlier, with the remaining half of the abutment yet to be cut on the 'peaces':


With the upper frame ring loosely slung together, I parked it on the post assembly for the moment:


In case you're wondering what hell I'm up to, here's the basic arrangement of this two-tier trellis:


The 'peaces' are about 2" too long at this point and will be trimmed back so there is the same projection on both halves of the joint.

At this point I need to trim the mitered abutments to close about a 1/32" (0.5mm) gap on each side:


A look at a couple of other preliminary corner assemblies - you can see in this photo how there is a corresponding 1/32" gap on the end of the rod tenon:


Ultimately, you want a clearance gap on the end of the rod tenon when all is snugged up for final fit, and not have it bottom out, which is a common error in cutting this joint.

Another corner, this time from the interior view:


All for now, hope you enjoyed the tour of today's wood butchery. On to Part Three.

4 comments:

  1. Thanks for this. I think I understand the process of the shachi pins a bit more.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Adam,

      thanks for the comment. If you're interested in learning further details about the intricacies of shachi sen, several pages are devoted to the topic in my Volume III of the TAJCD series. There are some important little counter-intuitive details which when observed make these joints come together as they should.

      ~C

      Delete
  2. LOVE all your work, except for the cut finger! (OUCH)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Julie,

      nice to hear from you and thanks for your concern about the finger injury. Fortunately, the wound is not so bad and I'm down to a single bandaid today.

      ~C

      Delete

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