Thursday, March 19, 2015

Gateway (72)

Post 72 in an ongoing series describing the design and construction of a kabukimon, a type of Japanese gate. This is a project for the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Post 1 in this series can be found here if you'd like to start at the beginning. Each post links to the next at the bottom of the page. Recent installments also to be found in the 'Blog archive' index to the right of the page.

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After some more work on the main doors this morning I turned my attention to the last bit of framing, namely the paneled section to the left side of the gate:


The panels had been cut out a month or so back, however they required a round of edge jointing and trimming to width and length. That left them needing finish planing and they were about an inch too wide to fit between the guide bars on the surfacer. That didn't stop me however, as I simply removed the guide bars from the surfacer altogether and ran about 2/3 of the boards through one way, flipped the board around and changed the belt feed direction for a second pass:


After several rounds, this process produced surfaced boards that were well planed. There was a little ridge or two on a couple of them, and the odd small missed spot, so I went over them with a hand plane afterwards to smooth over any such irregularities, however the surfacer worked really well in this manner I thought. It saved me a bunch of time.

I then did some more tuning with the hand plane on these boards to obtain uniform thicknesses at the panel edges of all three boards, and then edge jointed and grooved the edges for splines.

That done, I opened up the dadoes on the associated frame members until the panels could be fitted. Here's the leftmost panel fitted to the wall post:


Another view:


Then the opposing panel was fitted to the flanking post:


Another view:


That was followed by grooving the sill for the panels and then fitting the sill to the post and panel:


Another view:


The middle panel has had the splines glued in on both sides, so it will be ready to put together with its neighbors tomorrow.

My intention is to complete this paneled section tomorrow, at least in terms of cut out. The half-dovetailed battens need to be fitted to it yet, however there are only two of them so it shouldn't take too long to process the dovetails. It will be going to site as a pre-assembled unit, which will cut down on site assembly work.

Thanks for visiting the Carpentry Way. Please check out the next post, number 73

2 comments:

  1. Extract from a 2009 blog post that i read maybe one year after:

    "I hope to explore these topics in this blog, to describe how i go about designing and bulding pieces of furniture and buildings, and share my views on tradicional bulding and making, as a design-builder, in light of the modern context. I hope to reach an audience who also find these topics of interest, i hope to inspire others trough my exploration on the beauty and glory of traditionalcarpentry, as it is tremendously inspirational in my own life. This is the carpentry of solid wood, not veneers and glue, the art of joining with mortise & tenon, goose-neck and wedge, and peg, instead of biscuits or dowels, and the skills of the sharp plane blade instead of the sanding block."

    Excuse me if i´ll be too long...but it´ll worth it.

    So, as heapened after i read your blog´s first post, here i´m being inspired again. By that time, i was a "wanna-be woodworking hobbyst" , but you were one among others that helped to fire-start something inside me. All that joinery work, the overall concept off oriental carpentry, i always loved all that since i was younger.
    Since then, i have being migrating from my old professional experience, into the professional woodworking world. I took a intensive six month woodworking course, than went to work as a cabinetmaker for a company, and finally by myself, sadly the major market at were i live, in a large city at Brazil, is based more in "modern" techniques, large use of MDF, some plywood, etc...But i took my time to research and self-learning on solid wood...
    As i was still far away from my goals, and as Brazil is not at it´s best economic moment, and my wife beeing Japanese descendant, we decided to came work at Japan, for at least two years, maybe time(and saved money) enough so i can setup a small shop when coming back. Needless to say that i´m in love with the architecture here...all those temples, the houses...such a pleasure for the eyes.

    And all those years later, reserching again over japanese carpentry, i found the "Gateway" series...it took me quite an intensive reading since "Gateway post 1" until i reach this last update. What a treasure in detailing and technique. I´m impressed with how much your work evolved, and more impressed with how much you are commited with your hopes, sharing and passing away, not only the techique, but the respect for the concept, the respect for the wood, and for life itself. Impressed of how high you keep your standarts, allways pursuiting precision, beauty and perfection.

    Well, you were such well inspired that wednesday on january 28, 2009...I, from my side, hope that you have time and tranquility to apreciate that some of your hopes have being fullfilled ... :)

    From now on , I will be up to date with your posts, can´t wait to see the final assembly...and soon i´ll see me at the forum.

    Domô arigatô gozai mas.

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    Replies
    1. Marcelo,

      very touched at your long and detailed comment - thanks so much!!

      I am glad to have found that my meagre efforts have inspired someone in their own work. I can't ask for much more than that.

      ~C

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