Monday, February 16, 2015

Gateway (54)

Post 54 in an ongoing series describing the design and construction of a kabukimon, a type of Japanese gate. This is a project for the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Post 1 in this series can be found here if you'd like to start at the beginning. Each post links to the next at the bottom of the page. Recent installments also to be found in the 'Blog archive' index to the right of the page.

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I cracked open the other box from Zuani and here's what I found inside:


The spur cutters are removable, and the other knives cut with a shear:


This tenoning head cuts this twin tenon arrangement, a joint used between the top/bottom rails and the hinge-side stiles on the main doors:


Swapping out the middle disc of that head will allow me to cut the twin tenons for the side door.

The other tenoning head cuts this twin tenon arrangement, a joint used between the top and bottom rails and the hanging stiles on the main doors:


Along with the two tenoning heads I also received a few tools to take the heads apart and remove the insert knives, and a set of shims which will be used when I swap the alternate middle disc into the three-disc head:


Here are the two new heads then, side by side:


In the near future I'll have to build a cart to hold cutters like these. I saw some good ideas in that regard at Joe Calhoun's shop in Ouray.

I understand the replacement bore inserts, to allow me to use these heads with a 1.5" spindle, will be finished tomorrow, then inspected on Wednesday, and shipped Wednesday. Hopefully I'll have them in my hands by early next week.

This does introduce a bit of a delay into the door making. I nevertheless can make progress on various aspects. Today I re-jointed and planed the main door stiles to dimension, then laid out the mortises and rough cut them:


The layout was a little tricky as the hinge-side stiles, the smaller sections, are not mortised down the middle. Rather, they have mortises on the ends which are equally spaced from a centerline, and mortises elsewhere which are offset to one side. These doors have hanging stiles which are larger sections than the hinge-side stiles because of the way the door's drawbar is arranged. I had a little head scratching and scratched-out marks are there to be seen from the initial layout.

A closer look, with the hinge side stile above, and hanging stile below:


I would move to cleaning out the mortises next, however I would prefer to wait on that until I have tenoned the rails. So, next week it will be. My goal was to have the three doors made by the end of the month, and I should be able to achieve that even with the delay in obtaining the correct bore insert sleeves.

Tomorrow I can do the same process of layout and rough mortising with the side door stiles. I think this week will involve a bunch of random, 'tying up loose ends' sort of work tasks.

Thanks for coming by the Carpentry Way. Next up is post 55

2 comments:

  1. I know you will have worked out the economics, but thoses cutters look awful expensive! Can you get many variations of joint with them for other projects.
    Realy enjoying the build and the videos, Chris, thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gordon,

      thanks for the comment. Yes, the tooling is expensive, however I can get many variations from the same heads by changing the arrangement of spacers, and by obtaining other middle discs, so they should prove adaptable to a wide variety of tenoning tasks.

      ~C

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