Friday, January 9, 2015

Gateway (29)

Post 29 in an ongoing series describing the design and construction of a kabukimon, a type of Japanese gate. Post 1 in this series can be found here if you'd like to start at the beginning. Each post links to the next at the bottom of the page. Recent installments also located in the 'Blog archive' index to the right of the page.

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Took the nose pieces out of the 'oven' first thing to see how the umeki work came out:


I think these will suffice:



The light made the camera work tricky - I can't claim success in that regard:


There's a patch in there somewhere.

Cleaned the surface up a bit with the plane:


The rest of the day was consumed with the tenons on the main crossbeam, or kabuki. Here, I'm getting close to the conclusion of the work on the tenon cheeks:


The Kiyohisa plane is fast becoming one of my favorites:


The beam sitting in the orientation it will take in the structure - just the lower edge of the tenon remains to be taken to the line, and the kerfs will require patching of course:


The fact that the tenons are non-centered complicated the cut out a little bit.

A closer look at one near-complete tenon:


The tenon end remains about an inch long at this stage. These are long tenons!

The shop was a mess so the last hour of my day involved the broom and the dust collector.

All for today. Thanks for dropping by the Carpentry Way. On to post 30 if you like.

10 comments:

  1. Chris

    Do the extra long tenons allow more than two sen?

    Tom

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tom,

      thanks for your question, though I confess I am not sure exactly where you're going with it.

      There would be room to fit more than 2 shachi sen, however no reason to do so that I can think of. The tenons length relates to the fact that they pass through a 14" post before meeting their connecting member.

      If I haven't answered your question adequately, or you have further thoughts on the matter, please feel free.

      ~C

      Delete
  2. Chris,
    regarding the photography - high contrast scenes are difficult as something typically has to be under-exposed or alternatively over-exposed. In this case you would probably want the wooden beam to be correctly exposed and accept an under exposed background. To do this you would want to meter the scene off the timber. Most cameras will give you the ability to spot meter, an option you can usually select in the auto exposure menu. With spot metering selected you would put the focus box on the sun-lit wood and the auto exposure should correctly expose the scene for the brightness of the wood. Sorry if this is something you already know.
    Cheers
    Derek

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Derek,

      thanks for the info. far being something I already know, your advice read like some sort of exotic foreign language - tech speak from those living above ground, something like that. I really have no idea if i can do that with my digital camera but I will look into it.

      Cheers,

      ~C

      Delete
  3. Of course! Don't l feel silly?

    Thanks for all your time and effort bringing this to woodworkers world-wide.

    Tom

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh not at all my friend. Your question was perfectly reasonable and because of the way the story gradually unfolds here on the blog I know it can sometimes be hard for people to clearly understand how each part relates to the next until towards the end of the story.

      ~C

      Delete
  4. Chris,
    regarding the photography - high contrast scenes are difficult as something typically has to be under-exposed or alternatively over-exposed. In this case you would probably want the wooden beam to be correctly exposed and accept an under exposed background. To do this you would want to meter the scene off the timber. Most cameras will give you the ability to spot meter, an option you can usually select in the auto exposure menu. With spot metering selected you would put the focus box on the sun-lit wood and the auto exposure should correctly expose the scene for the brightness of the wood. Sorry if this is something you already know.
    Cheers
    Derek

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi Chris,
    Back in post 27 you mention your goal of bringing exposure to the practice of sewari to western woodworkers. It might sound more attractive if you avoid the words like "patching" or "repairing" to refer to the practice of closing up the kerf after they are no longer needed. They sound negative to my ear, as if one were correcting a mistake. How about "closing up the drying kerf" or "filling" or "completing" the kerf.

    Peace,
    Harlan Barnhart

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Harelan,

      well, your observation is an interesting one. The thing is, not always is the sewari having anything done to it afterwards. If the surface is away from view, especially, then the kerf is left as-is. My use of the word 'patching' is the most literal from the Japanese term 'umeki'. Would you prefer the term 'Dutchman'? I hate that term.

      I'm not trying to massage the language to make things sound rosier to certain ears. I'm trying to 'sell' the logic of this process by showing how it is done, on a case by case sort of basis, while explaining why it is done. Since the vast majority of people doing timber framing in N. America are using green wood, I doubt there will be many following this method, however it may be of interest to some readers at least. There is no point to the method if the timber is not actively dried after the cuts are made.

      That said, I do hear from you that this is sounding negative in some way to your ears. The term "completing" the kerf sounds a bit absurd to me, however 'filling' in the kerf is fine - I will throw that into the mix from now on.

      ~C

      Delete

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