Saturday, December 13, 2014

A Square Deal (50)

The big 5-0. Not too many threads here reach to such extended counts. It's been a most enjoyable journey.

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I have been working on finishing up the coffee table assembly. I've given the slab top and breadboard ends another coat or two of finish.

Assembly-wide, the corner pillow blocks have been polished up and installed, with dabo driven in, two per corner block assembly, as was shown in an earlier post describing the side table assembly.

The middle pillow blocks have been fitted, and the post tenons trimmed to length, and the tenons then notched for the breadboard connections:


I've also waxed the frame parts.

A closer look at one of the notched tenons:


A slightly different view:


I was hoping to see the leveler feet for this table appear today, but the machinist was a no show, so it looks like it will be Monday for those.

My wife dropped by to take a look at how the tables were coming along, and while she was there she filmed me putting the drawer in the side table, to show, to a certain extent at least, a general sense of the fit and action:



Just a short clip, but I hope it was worth a look.

I got the slab top fitted to the frame as well today, so it should be installed, along with the breadboard ends, sometime tomorrow.

Thanks for coming by the Carpentry Way. Another post in this series awaits: 51

8 comments:

  1. Great clip, and I finally get a sense of scale on the side table. Much smaller and more delicate than I imagined. Beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Siavosh,

      hey, didn't realize how helpful a video would be in that regard -good to know! Thanks for the comment.

      ~C

      Delete
  2. CHRIS;
    Just love the color of the wood! Will have to build something to see it myself. Keep them coming, never can be to many, maybe not enough! Someday hope to have at least half your talent! Thanx for all!!
    J.T.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. JT,

      always appreciate your enthusiastic comments. Get yourself some bubinga and see how you like it. It's a tough wood, but not abrasive on tools especially.

      ~C

      Delete
  3. Chris, I feel like this series of posts should be bound and printed to use a a textbook - there is so much going on here that is nothing like I have seen in any of the furniture or other woodworking books on my shelves. Inspiring and thought provoking, I've loved the amount of detail and the many different joints used to keep it together with just the wood. Your client is going to be well pleased.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Shaun,

      a very nice comment to receive - you are too kind. I'm glad you get what has gone into this piece, as I have devoted a lot of energy to the design and making.

      ~C

      Delete
  4. i started machining metal long ago. it was when i became stuck in that industry that my admiration for the fine tolerances and craftsmanship of cabinet makers began. simply said, i love your shit. i've been lurking for years and figured it's time to come out the woodwork and express some gratitude. if you ever need an entirely free host of say, large files, or anything you'd like the public to access w/o worrying about bandwidth then reach out to me: gabriel@cpixel.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gabriel,

      most generous of you to offer your services. i will file that away for future reference. Glad you enjoy the work I'm doing and showing here. It's validating for me to receive such kind comments as i have been receiving of late.

      ~C

      Delete

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